WARP Update – Shiney New Prototype

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WARP is continually developing to be a solid piece of work! Better icons, more clarity, class guidelines and an action board! I had a chance to play it a couple of weeks ago at a designer colaboration event called Protospiel in Madison Wisconsin with nearly 200 attendees.

The most exciting part of playing it there is that players did not complain about the main things they used to. No feedback is often the best feedback! I’m excited to show you the main changes!

Card Update:
A lot of love has gone into the card’s appearance. The core of the game-play revolves around card use, their development is of utmost importance. Here you see a lot of color has been added to the new card (on the right).


Reading the card is a lot simpler using the icons and colors. A lot of squinting from across the table is mitigated by this.  You may have noticed that the icon regarding ammo has been removed entirely. While thematically having limited ammunition for items made sense, time and time again I was finding players struggling with the reloading mechanic, and sometimes if the issue comes up too consistently; the best solution is the clip it out entirely! Probably the thing that had the most impact is that the initiative (C:2 on the old card) has been changed to be much more visually prominent, so there’s less time wasted on determining the next player! Streaming player actions has been a struggle for me, so the success of the Action Board is most encouraging!

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After players choose their actions, they now place them in order on the action board, so all players can easily see which actions belong to who and who will be acting next. Eliminating this downtime of asking around the table to find who is up next dramatically increases how quickly each round progresses.

Better game aids are great! On the action board above, you’ll see listed actions that anyone can make without playing a card. Having them on the main board, once again creates a focus of attention during the action phase, so everyone has their heads up together.

Speaking of Aids, the new player mats have the reference sheet condensed on them:

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along with tokens to match the Hand and mobility points a player spends for each phase. This encourage easier tracking of player resources and more condensed rule explanations since all of that is together!

The are some other substantial changes that I’d like to share (especially with game setup), but this post has grown long enough! I will most definitely be talking about how setup went from overwhelming to being enjoyed by players. I feel most accomplished from that compliment from a first time player!

I’ve recently put up a facebook page for WARP, please click here to like the page and see progress pictures of WARP!

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Thanks for reading!
~Andrew Voigt

Follow me on Twitter! @gamestothetable
Facebook.com/andrewrvoigt
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The Dark Forest: An Overview.

The Dark Forest is a Narrative Horror game where you experience the story of your character, influencing it based on what objectives you complete or fail. Through the night, when you unlock the listed prerequisites, you’ll unlock additional pieces to your story. Below is an example of Theodore’s Character page. The event text for each event is in the character’s booklet.


Each character has several endgame resolutions they can achieve. Most of which include one where they’re successful in their quest, and two others, sometime resulting in an unpleasant end, other times ending up being something that’s worse than death for the character

Game play:
Players will be wandering through a map of disappearing forest tiles, trying to locate the landmarks they seek for their character’s objectives. Working together to help clear paths and explore the dark corners of the forest. These woods are untrustworthy though!

14691142_686971274796544_627881758864717069_nThe night seems to shifts the paths in the dark. Every Time a player steps too far away from an explored tile, it disappears from the board. Making it so no path is entirely reliable! As unreliable the forest is, it’s even more dangerous! Each tile corresponds to a different difficulty of encounters that the poor lost players must navigate through.

These encounters set up the situation and require the player to choose how they want to address the challenge, using their character’s skills to test against what is brought before them.

 

As the night goes on players are pressed with dropping stats and ticking time to strain for their objectives before the dawn comes.

It is my goal to evoke the feeling of being lost in the woods, and your mind creating its own fears about what could be lurking behind every shadow!

I’m revamping a lot of my encounter mechanics and making them tie into the forest map better. Stay tuned, I hope to have that together by the end of November.

Thank you for reading! Please visit my Facebook and YouTube channels if you want to be kept up to date on the development! 

Follow me on Twitter! @gamestothetable

 

Facebook.com/andrewrvoigt


https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCklJwa7TroVLxd25ODLFYlA

Protospiel Madison 2015 Recap (Andrew)

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Last weekend Marcin (another local designer) and I headed over to Madison, Wisconsin for a designer peer review event call Protopiel, hosted by The Game Crafter. I made a quick video highlighting some of my takeaways and my time there! Enjoy!

A brief recap of my time at a game design peer review event in Madison Wisconsin. 10/23/2015 – 10/25/2015

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